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A.5 On-Line Resources

On-line resources appear, disappear, and move with great speed, so all the addresses here (and elsewhere in the book), which were correct at the time of writing, are obviously subject to change without notice after publication. Hopefully, the most valuable resources should be readily findable using standard search tools.

One of the key on-line resources is the GP bibliography (Langdon et al.1995-2008). 3 At the time of writing, this bibliography contains about 5,000 GP entries, roughly half of which can be downloaded immediately.4

The GP bibliography has a variety of interfaces, including a graphical representation of GP's collaborative network (see Figure  A.1 ). The bibliography allows for quick jumps between papers linked by authors and allows one to sort the author list by the number of GP publications. Full references are provided in both BIBTEX and Refer formats for direct inclusion in papers written in LATEX and Microsoft Word, respectively. The GP bibliography is also part of the Collection of Computer Sciences Bibliographies (Achilles and Ortyl1995-2008), which provides a comprehensive Lucerne syntax search engine.


PIC

Figure A.1: Co-authorship connections within GP. Each of the 1,141 dots indicates an author, and edges link people who have co-authored one or more GP papers. (To reduce clutter only links to first authors are shown.) The size of each dot indicates the number of entries. The on-line version is annotated using JavaScript and contains hyperlinks to authors and their GP papers. The graph was created by GraphViz twopi, which tries to place strongly connected people close together. This diagram displays just the "centrally connected component" (?) and contains approximately half of all GP papers. The remaining papers are not linked by co-authorship to this graph. Several other large components are also available on-line via the GP Bibliography (Langdon et al.1995-2008).


From early on there has been an active, open email discussion list: the Genetic Programming mailing list (2001-2008). The EC-Digest (1985-2008) is a moderated list covering evolutionary computation more broadly, and often contains GP related announcements.

Koza's http://www.genetic-programming.org/ contains a ton of useful information for the novice, including a short tutorial on "What is Genetic Programming" and the Lisp implementation of GP from Genetic Programming (Koza1992).


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